Slovenia

Slovenia :: Books

Travel Guides

Short descriptions of Slovenia appear in three of Lonely Planet's regional guides listed in the Overview section: Europe on a Shoestring, Eastern Europe, and the more detailed Western Balkans. For good measure it is also included in their guide to Central Europe.

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The Rough Guide to Slovenia  (3rd edition published April 2010) - Norm Longley

Typically detailed coverage from Rough Guides, allocating a generous 352 pages to this small country.

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Slovenia - Lonely Planet Country Guide  (6th edition published May 2010) - Steve Fallon

I have used both the Lonely Planet and Rough Guide on different visits to Slovenia. Although I generally prefer Rough Guides, in this instance there is little to choose between them - if you are going to Slovenia I don't think you'll go wrong with either one.

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Slovenia - The Bradt Guide  (2nd edition published May 2008) - Robin & Jenny McKelvie

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Ljubljana - The Bradt Guide  (2nd edition published August 2007) - Robin & Jenny McKelvie

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Ljubljana In Your Pocket

Ljubljana is one of the newest additions to In Your Pocket's excellent range of city guides. The guide can be bought locally or downloaded from the website as a free PDF file.

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Background Reading

It appears that very little has been written about Slovenia in English. Even the books about the former Yugoslavia listed in the Overview tend to pass over Slovenia in silence. The modern travelogues The Impossible Country and Through the Embers of Chaos have only a handful of references to Slovenia between them, and the index of Black Lamb and Grey Falcon points to only three references in its 1100 pages.

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The Radetzky March - Joseph Roth

Back then an Austrian District Commissioner of the stamp of Herr Von Trotta would have been less distressed by news of his only son's death than by the mere suggestion that he had conducted himself dishonourably.

I suppose I'm stretching a point by classifying The Radetzky March, the great novel of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, as a book about Slovenia or the Balkans. But its central characters do come from Slovenia, and anyway this book deserves to be read by anyone with an interest in European history or literature. Roth creates a compelling sense of impending doom, as the Empire's elaborate rituals and codes of behaviour prove insufficient to stave off its collapse.

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